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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
. john boehner doesn't have the leverage he used to have. on a conference call he told house republicans they had to avoid the nasty showdowns that mark so much of the last two years. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell was the number one obstructionist in the president's first term. now he tells "the wall street journal" he'll do whatever it takes to get a deal. i'd be willing to pay the ransom if e we thought we were going to get the hostage out. but the hostage is what? entitlement spending. mcconnell's intention, he's willing to agree to a dollar of new taxes for every dollar in cuts. what a difference an election makes. >> i'm going to ask a question on the stage. they seau had a real spending cuts deal, 10 to 1. spending cuts to tax increases. spooker, you're already shaking your head. but who on this stage would walk away from that deal? would you raise your hand about not raising taxes. >> remember in 2011 republicans would not take a 10 to 1 tax cut deal? now today mitch mcconnell is willing to do a 1 to 1 deal. republicans lost all of their leverage in this election. they
.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's a joke. a joke. >> house speaker john boehner has been far milder in this rhetoric. according to politico, some house republicans might consider a tax hike on millionaires. many republican lawmakers privately concede that the 2012 election left them far short of a mandate on taxes. and if urged by democrats to raise rates on the megawealthy, they will have a tough time resisting. for the record, president obama's position sounds much more in line with senator sanders' way of thinking. >> there are some tough things that have to be done, but there's a way of doing this that does not hurt middle class families, that does not hurt our seniors, doesn't hurt families with disabled kids. >> let's bring in ruth conif, political editor for the progressive magazine. also with us tonight, e.j. dionne, msnbc contributor, "washington post" columnist and author of the book "our divided political heart." great to have both of you with us tonight. ruth, you first. you know, this could set up to be a moment of real disappointment for liberals if the democrat
of the united states. house speaker john boehner has less support each day for a hard line approach. republican opposition to tax increases is slipping in congress. anti-tax lobbyist grover norquist no longer as a majority of supporters in either chamber. "the hill" says newly elected republicans refuse to sign the anti-tax pledge during the campaigns and another handful of returning republicans have disavowed their alliance to the written commitment. it's about time. at least they paid attention to the election. today bobby jindal scolded the entire party for the approach to the economy. hold it right there. this comment, he sewer sounds like a democrat. we've got to make sure that weren't the party of big business, big banks, big wall street bailouts, big corporate loophole, big anything. we cannot be, we must not be the party that simply protects the rich so they get to keep their toys. bobby, come on over to the good side, dude. you're talking like a conservative democrat. momentum is on the president's side. he just needs to know how motivated his allies are. the hard work didn't end last
consens consensus. john boehner got the message. >> to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long as it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. >> senate majority leader harry reid and democratic leader nancy pelosi sounded equally positive. >> we have the cornerstones of being able to work something out. we'll both have to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. >> we understand that it has to be about cuts, it has to be about revenue, it has to be about growth. >> then came senate minority leader mitch mcconnell. so we might have a fly in the ointment. here it is. >> i can say on the part of my members that we fully understand that you can't save the country until you have entitlement programs that fit the demographics of the changing america in the coming years. we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> the real problem? let me tell you something, senator. the real problem is two unfunded wars from the bush years, the bush tax cuts, and the give away to big pharma. senator mcconnell, it seems to me l
rejected the mitt romney, john boehner solution for tax reform. >> what i will not do is to have a process that is vague, that says we're going to sort of, kind of raise revenue through dynamic scoring or closing loopholes that have not been identified. and the reason i won't do that is because i don't want to find ourselves in a position six months from now or a year from now, where lo and behold, the only way to close the deficit is to sock it to middle class families. >> now, that is the classiest way i have ever seen anybody say, you know what, somebody's got to pick up the bar tab, boys. this is what president obama ran against in the presidential election. mitt romney's approach to tax reform was, trust me. the american public wanted specifics. and president obama continued to give specifics today, but the economy wasn't the only thing on the president's mind today. earlier in the day, here's another development. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice came under fire from republican senators. senators john mccain and lindsey graham, back at it, trying to trump up the ambassador
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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